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January 2015 - Toefco

21 Jan

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What is Halar Coating?

January 21, 2015 | By | No Comments

What is Halar coating? Most people have no idea. Halar is actually the brand name for ethylene chlorotrifluoroethylene, or ECTFE. ECTFE is marketed as Halar by Solvay Solexis. However, that doesn’t do much to answer the question. If you don’t know what Halar is, you probably don’t have a clue what chlorotrifluoroethylene is, either. Here is the lowdown on ECTFE, or Halar.

The most basic explanation for Halar is that it is a type of plastic. This particular type of plastic known as Halar is special because it is semi-crystalline and melt-processable. There are additional properties of Halar that make it desirable for use as an industrial coating. These properties include:

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14 Jan

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What is Fluoropolymer Coating?

January 14, 2015 | By | No Comments

What is a fluoropolymer coating? You may not have heard of a fluoropolymer, but you are probably exposed to examples of it every day.

A fluoropolymer is a polymer that is based in fluorocarbon and has strong carbon-fluoride bonds. But that doesn’t explain much if you don’t know what a polymer is. A polymer is a chemical compound that is made of many molecules that have low mass. A polymer is a huge class of compounds; it includes both synthetics, like plastic, and also naturally occurring polymers like wool, silk, and rubber. A fluoropolymer is a more specific type of a polymer that has special properties. Read More

07 Jan

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What is PTFE Industrial Coating?

January 7, 2015 | By | No Comments

PTFE sounds like a lot of scientific, technical mumbo jumbo. However, you might be surprised to learn that PTFE is a lot less complicated than you thought. In fact, you probably have some PTFE in your kitchen right now.

PTFE is better known by its brand name: Teflon. You likely have a collection of non-stick pots and pans that are coated with PTFE. PTFE stands for polytetrafluoroethylene. It was actually discovered by accident in 1938 by scientist Roy Plunkett. Within 10 years, PTFE had hit the commercial market under the brand name Teflon. Of course, Teflon is best known for its non-stick properties. Read More